Kyushu, Day 9: Nagasaki Peace Park

Going to Nagasaki’s Peace Park, we got off Ohashi Station instead of Peace Park. We decided to start at the end of the park then walk our way towards A-Bomb Museum.

MARCH 12, 2020

Going to NAGASAKI’S PEACE PARK, we got off Ohashi Station instead of Peace Park. We decided to start at the end of the park then walk our way towards A-Bomb Museum.

Our first encountered monument was the Peace Statue which symbolized a lot of meanings:

  • Right hand points to the threat of nuclear weapons
  • Left hand symbolizes tranquility and world peace
  • Sturdy physique embodies divine omnipotence and love
  • Closed eyes express prayer for the repose of the souls of all war victims
  • Right leg is for quiet meditation
  • Left leg is poised for action in assisting humanity

There was also a bell tower with a horrific account of a survivor from the atomic bombing in 1945…

Other monuments / statues in the park were gifted by different countries as an act of grief and prayer to never experience the tragedy of nuclear weapons ever again.

Similar to Hiroshima, Nagasaki’s Peace Park also had its Fountain of Peace.

Near the park was the HYPOCENTER OF ATOMIC BOMB. There were info sheets detailing the tragedy that happened in 1945. The original remnant wall of Urakami Cathedral was also placed here.

They also encased stones that were damaged by the atomic bomb which served as proof that even sturdy materials were not spared by the explosion and radiation. Another grim reminder on the horrible effects of nuclear weapon.

Kyushu, Day 2: Hiroshima City

We walked going to Hiroshima’s Peace Memorial Park after our late lunch. This park was established near the hypocenter of the atomic bomb dropped in 1945.

MARCH 5, 2020

When we got back to the city center of Hiroshima, we went to SENMON KING KEN. This shop is famous for its shiru nashi tantanmen (soupless tantanmen).

We ordered the smallest size of shiru nashi tantanmen (¥630) since we were still full from our brunch in Miyajima. The dish looked simple but it was packed with meaty and spicy flavors. The taste was not close to tantanmen but not a negative for me.

We walked going to HIROSHIMA’S PEACE MEMORIAL PARK after our late lunch. This park was established near the hypocenter of the atomic bomb dropped in 1945. Before the bombing, this area was the political and commercial heart of the city.

The Peace Memorial Museum was, unfortunately, closed due to COVID-19. Near the museum was the Cenotaph for A-Bomb Victims, an arch structure dedicated for those who died because of the bomb – either due to the initial blast or radiation exposure.

Walking a bit more and we saw the Flame of Peace, a symbol of the citizens’ desire for a world free from nuclear weapons. It is said that the flame will burn up until the day when all nuclear weapons have disappeared.

Some more memorials we encountered before reaching A-Bomb Dome…

Our last stop in the park was the Atomic Bomb Dome, the remains of the former Prefectural Industrial Promotion Hall. This is one of the few buildings that remained standing after the bombing. A-Bomb Dome is a UNESCO World Heritage Site as it serves to be a tangible memory to the tragic event in Hiroshima.

We visited HIROSHIMA CASTLE afterwards but we can only see the outside as the operating hours were affected due to COVID-19 as well.

Before going back to Fukuoka, we had to eat the famous Hiroshima okonomiyaki at NAGATAYA. We ordered their bestseller (¥1,380) and had the egg cooked instead of raw (my sister doesn’t like it). Good thing we shared one order because the serving size was generous. Highly recommend this!